Posted on Saturday, January 23, 2016
By Kadri Tinn
Planetary Vistas: The Landscapes of Other Worlds by Paul Murdin


It's quite rare for a book about astronomy to dwell on landscapes of other planets and moons, although you might read about how Galileo was able to see mountains on the Moon and you can read about craters on different planets and volcanoes on Mars, the actual landscape is rarely the main topic, which makes this book quite unique.

I enjoyed how you get a different perspective on the planets and the moon by reading this book and looking at the pictures and focusing more on the details in the images because the authors points out things you might not notice otherwise. You might have seen dozens of panoramas of Mars taken by rovers, and some in this book might be familiar, but it's the descriptions that make the book - it goes more deeply into the making of the pictures and what's in it, how is it different etc.

It's a great book that is a pleasure to go through just as a bit of light reading in quite a short time, but you find out more about our Solar System while doing so.

The book does make you wish that all pictures of Martian landscapes or Apollo landing sites etc had detailed descriptions that would be more of a guided tour through a picture that might otherwise be rather dull, but with proper guidance you can see it better.
Posted on Saturday, January 23, 2016
By Kadri Tinn


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Posted on Saturday, January 23, 2016
By Kadri Tinn

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Posted on Friday, December 18, 2015
By Kadri Tinn
Posted on Friday, December 18, 2015
By Kadri Tinn
Posted on Monday, October 26, 2015
By Kadri Tinn

Elephants in Space by Ben Moore

If you're looking for an all-encompassing read about the Universe, then "Elephants in Space" is a good start.

With less than 200 pages, this book is basically a crash course in the history of the Universe, starting with how scientists theorize the Universe went from a tiny speck to the size it is now and what happened in-between and what will happen in the future. Although that in itself seems like a long and complicated topic, the author gets through it all in a fast paced manner with several side-trips to go into more details where needed.

In addition to the history of the universe, the book also goes into the fascinating topic of life in the universe - how it emerged on Earth and whether there's any hope of finding it outside of Earth and could we possibly colonize other planets.

The book ends with the ultimate end though - the end of the Universe, which is always a slightly sad event to read about.
It will be positive though, if you just remind yourself that we live at a special time when other galaxies can be seen and also that most of the bright stars we see in the night sky are giant stars, something you're unlikely to come across at the end of the universe (the end time-wise; space-wise, there would still be more giant stars if you look towards the beginning of the Universe).

"Elephants in Space" was a very enjoyable and interesting read. It's popular in scope so you don't need higher mathematics to understand it, but it's still fun even if you've read a lot cosmology before.


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Posted on Tuesday, September 29, 2015
By Kadri Tinn

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